design thinking

Want to learn how Customer Journey Mapping can enhance your programs?

Sign up for our training.

On June 22, we’re partnering with the Workforce Professionals Training Institute for a half-day skills-building workshop on Customer Journey Mapping. Journey Mapping is a technique for understanding how clients move through your services, and a great way to identify opportunities to enhance services in ways that address client needs. During this training, workforce practitioners will learn how to problem-solve in real time based on customer feedback on what’s working well and where pain points exist. We will share tools and resources to help your team redesign current services or design new ones through the journey mapping practice.

 

In this workshop, you will:

  • Learn how to understand and diagnose client experience by developing user profiles;
  • Analyze findings to design new experiences or redesign existing process; and
  • Implement changes to your programs and services, while measuring results.

 

Intended Audience
Program Directors, Supervisors, Management Staff

Learn more and register today.

March 2017 Newsletter: Sharing and Building Our Skills

Sharing our skills:

Director Allison Quigney and Manager Moe Magali facilitated a two-part session at NYATEP’s Youth Academy on integrating design thinking into youth workforce programs. Participants explored how design thinking – in laymen’s terms, a problem-solving process – could help develop new programs or enhance existing services. They also had hands-on practice conducting their own customer journey mapping sessions to better understand the experiences of clients and opportunities, with the goal to adjust service delivery to align with those experiences.  Journey maps illustrate what people do and feel when interacting with a service. The inclusion of human behavior in the mapping – motivations, interests, and pain points – helps programs ensure clients have a consistently high level of satisfaction when receiving services. We had a great time at the session and throughout the conference discussing youth workforce strategies with colleagues across the field.

 

Building our skills:

 

Public Works CEO Celeste Frye is grateful to join the current cohort of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program at LaGuardia Community College. This development program helps entrepreneurs create jobs and economic growth by providing access to education, capital, and support services. We see this as an unparalleled opportunity to enhance the ways we manage and grow our business offerings, and are looking forward to learning from other participants and program sponsors.

We’re also excited to announce that Analyst Julia Deutsch is participating in NYU Wagner’s Fellowship for Emerging Leaders in Public Service. Known as FELPS, the program brings together young professionals across nonprofit, philanthropic, and government entities to explore ways to collectively address challenges facing the public sector, and identify opportunities to optimize their individual impact in the areas they are most passionate about. We know this leadership opportunity will position Julia to continue advancing positive change through our work and beyond.

And everything in between:

 

Earlier this month, we also:

Joined the Center for an Urban Future’s panel on preparing NYC’s economy and workforce for the next wave of automation. The group explored problem-solving skills needed for 21stcentury jobs and strategies for adjusting the social safety net for the new economy. The conversation certainly left us contemplating strategies for creating flexible frameworks to get ahead of rapidly changing workplaces.

 

Took time to recognize International Women’s Day with colleagues at Civic Hall, hearing from female leaders in NYC government on ways the City is advancing gender equality and access. We also brainstormed ways our woman-owned business can create positive change through our work and beyond. We look forward to working with our many partners and colleagues to advance these issues in all the days to come.

February 2017 Newsletter: What We’re Reading and What We’re Up To

What We’re Reading

Doneliza Joaquin

About a high-school program that intersects mathematics, data analysis, mapmaking, and understanding of the urban landscape currently on exhibit at Cooper Hewitt for its use of inclusive community design.

 

 

Julia Deutsch

The Furman Center’s straightforward economic analysis of the latest reform proposal for the 421-a Program, focusing on how new wage requirements could impact city tax payers and developers alike.

 

 

Moe Magali

The business case for companies to invest in re-skilling their workforce, with or without incentives from the public sector, and clearly communicating the purpose of new training to get the best results out of employees and for business interests.

 

 

Diana Petty

A match-making app that connects M/WBE businesses with City and State business opportunities.

 

 

 

What We’re Up To:

We love that our work takes us across all five boroughs. We travel from our Manhattan office to the Bronx to support Lincoln Center Education as they increase their programming in Community School District 7 and think about how to most effectively meet the needs of parents, teachers, and students. We’re also in Queens on a team led by HR&A working with the Queens Borough President’s Office and Queens Chamber of Commerce on the Jamaica Downtown Revitalization Initiative, helping the local planning committee identify workforce projects that will best fit future growth in the area. In Brooklyn, we’re in our third year providing technical assistance and performance management support for the Change Capital Fund grantees, including Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation, St. Nicks Alliance, Bronx-based New Settlement and Stronger Together, to track common outcomes and understand effective strategies for collectively combating povertyThen, we hop the ferry to get to the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation where we’re working to understand the needs of small industrial businesses and design a program model to connect local residents to training and job opportunities ahead. And, touching all boroughs plus other parts of New York and New Jersey, we’re supporting Goodwill to develop a strategic plan that will harness the organization’s strengths to focus on its core mission.

Next month, we hit the road to NYATEP’s Youth Academy. We’ll be facilitating a practice building workshop on how to use design thinking to address youth workforce challenges. We’ll ground participants in how to integrate design thinking principles into program development, and provide hands-on opportunities to practice this for your work!

Contact Us

Mailing Address
99 Madison Avenue
Suite 403
New York, NY 10016
(347) 619-2892
info@publicworkspartners.com